LA Confidential



(Las Vegas) The award for the year’s most puzzling headline goes to the Los Angeles Times for this doozy on David Sarno’s story about iPhone usage: “AT&T may penalize iPhone users who hog data.”

It’s a great headline, at least to the extent that “penalize” is a shorthand way of saying, “Those who consume a lot of a product should pay more than those who only use a little.” Actually, Sarno’s article is fairly straightforward and is one more example of how the current uniform data pricing structure among wireless carriers is increasingly untenable.

According to the head of AT&T’s wireless division, three percent of iPhone users are chewing up 40+ percent of the company’s bandwidth. Credit the proliferation of mobile video options. But this imbalance should hardly come as a surprise since a similar imbalance has existed on wired broadband for years.

Japan, which led the world in wired broadband, faced a similar issue well before America did. Thanks mostly to P2P, fewer than five percent of subscribers consumed almost half the country’s bandwidth. For a good resource on this, here’s the 2007 report on net neutrality from Japan’s Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications.

Specifically, look at the usage charts on pages 17-19 and the conclusions on pages 59-66.