© 1998-2017, Arnold Consulting Group, L.L.C.
Offices in Washington, DC
and Vienna, VA
703.629.8552

 
 

February 17, 2012

“A sort of homecoming”

Filed under: Jody Powell — Peter Arnold

Robert DawsonWashington’s salons have long known that on matters of environmental regulation, the gentleman at left is without peer. Robert K. Dawson, former Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works during the Reagan Administration, founded the eponymous Dawson & Associates in 1998 and during the past decade, the firm has established a reputation as Washington’s premier experts in natural resources regulation, environmental permitting, energy, defense, infrastructure, and government contracting..

With ten former Flag Officers, mostly drawn from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Dawson team offers a wealth of expertise that no other firm in Washington can match.  That is why I am proud to offer the following announcement today in concert with Mr. Dawson and the top-notch team at his company:

Dawson & Associates Welcomes
Peter Arnold as Senior Advisor

(Washington, D.C.) – Peter Arnold, a former White House and Capitol Hill staffer who has run several major lobbying coalitions for the telecommunications and high-tech industries during the past decade, has joined Dawson & Associates as a Senior Advisor, the firm announced today.

You can read more here.

I will continue to lead Arnold Consulting Group, as I have since 1998.  But I will now also be responsible for overseeing Dawson & Associates’ public affairs and crisis communications efforts on behalf of its clients.  In a sense, this is (apologies to Bono) a “sort of homecoming” since I first worked with Mr. Dawson in the early 1990s during my time with Jody Powell and Sheila Tate.  Twenty years later, things have come full circle and for that, I extend a tremendous feeling of gratitude to this gentleman for his faith in me.

— Peter Arnold

January 2, 2012

A class act

Filed under: Jody Powell,White House — Peter Arnold

Sheila TateAnyone wondering if remarkable people still rise to the top in Washington, D.C. should take a moment and read the email below. Sheila Tate, former press secretary to Nancy Reagan and spokesman for the 1988 George Bush Presidential campaign, is retiring after a remarkable career proving that Alan Alda was half-right when he said, “It’s better to be wise than smart.”  In Sheila’s case, she was both.

Nearly 20 years ago, the Washington intelligensia was rocked with the news that Sheila and former White House press secretary Jody Powell had created an eponymous firm, Powell Tate.  It was the summer of 1991 and the firm quickly established itself as “the” place for corporations in need of crisis help.

Sheila brought me into Powell Tate about six weeks after the company started which only goes to show that her judgment even in those glory years was remarkably fallible.  I had had the privilege of working with her on the 1988 Bush campaign, where she was chief spokesman though it should be noted that I did not write a certain line about the California raisins.

Everyone who ever worked with Sheila has favorite anecdotes and this writer is no exception:

  • At a surprise birthday party for Sheila in 1991, a senior Powell Tate consultant gently ribbed her during a toast about a client problem that happened when the two worked at a different PR shop.  When the toast was over, Sheila smilingly replied, “Michelle, we always hated you back then.”
  • After the first President Bush had an unfortunate stomach incident during a state visit to Japan, Sheila went on CNN and was asked if this represented a “burp” on the Bush Presidency.  Not missing a beat, she replied that “I think it’s more of a ‘yurp’ than a ‘burp.'”
  • My favorite: a photo taken shortly after the rather bitter 1988 Presidential election showing Sheila standing between George H.W. Bush and Mike Dukakis.  As I recall, the incoming Prez wrote underneath it, “To Sheila, Only you could referee this one.”

Sheila, if you’re reading this, there are two things you should know.  First, you and Jody were a remarkable influence on me that I will never forget.  Second, I was underpaid.

As I sit at my computer on a very cold Christmas Eve day, I can’t help think about the fact that when Jody and I started Powell Tate in 1991 we didn’t have computers.  Nor did we have cell phones or blackberries; social media would have sounded like a disease.  Hmm.  Maybe not a bad definition.

Powell Tate started with about 10 employees and far fewer clients.  We were in very cramped quarters in the Metropolitan Square Building.  The great part was we got to design our new space at 700 Thirteenth Street from scratch.  And now, a mere 20 years later, you’re leaving it!

Back in the “early days”, I was an early bird, usually at work about 7:30am.  Jody showed up about 10am.  I left by 6pm and he worked into the evening hours which was great for West Coast clients and a few European clients as well.  We grew rapidly and we all worked as hard as we needed to, even overnight on occasion, and created great memories while doing great work for our clients.

On January 1st I will be erased from the IPG systems and my new address will be: ______.  The company has allowed me to slide slowly into retirement and I now embrace it with enthusiasm!  Before that happens, I need to wish each of you a wonderful Powell Tate experience, a long and rewarding career and great memories.  Don’t lose the essence of our culture where the individual and hard work is valued and the team is valued more; and above all, stay loyal to your clients and give them your very best.  I hope each of you can look back when you are about to retire and know you did your best, you loved your work and you truly admire your colleagues.  And, if you want me to be really happy, vote Republican.

Sheila Tate

December 27, 2009

Farewell & Adieu, MMIX

Before bidding 2009 a bon voyage, it’s worth noting two recent media commentaries. First, Francis Wilkinson has a warm and wonderful portrayal of the great Jody Powell in today’s New York Times. His portrayal brought back the usual flood of Powell memories (for more, click here and here) as well as reconfirming that while Washington hosts more than its share of phonies, it also catapults to success some truly outstanding, wonderful people.

Next up is Andy Kessler’s oped in Saturday’s Wall Street Journal. Kessler’s usually pretty sharp on technology and telecom which is why this column is so disappointing. For starters, his idea of setting up a nationwide wireless system by linking transmitters to street lights is fanciful. AT&T tried it in St. Louis and backed out in 2007 because the technology just didn’t work.

Moreover, Kessler’s comment about the telecos and employment is just plain absurd. AT&T is the nation’s largest private sector employer of union workers. While Google has a larger market cap than AT&T it employs 10 times fewer people and has a capex budget less than one-eighth as large. So which one seems more likely to start hiring?

That’s it for 2009. Thanks for reading and feel free to sign up for my RSS feed. See you in 2010!

September 21, 2009

More Thoughts About Jody

Filed under: Asides,Jody Powell — Peter Arnold


(New York) A week has passed and the outpouring of fond reminiscences about Jody Powell continues. It should. From Sam Donaldson, we learned that Jody once poured a glass of red wine over his head in response to an ABC News segment. Did Jody have malice aforethought? Knowing Jody, there’s only one possible answer.

Personally, my favorite anecdote involving Jody happened on election night 1992: It was the loudest I ever heard him laugh. The networks had made a point of declaring that they wouldn’t predict a winner in the Presidential contest until the polls had closed in California. That was 10 PM EST. But at 9:30, Ross Perot came out and declared that Bill Clinton would be the next President. I was at the Powell Tate election party at the Willard in DC. There were about a dozen of us and Jody burst into the room laughing furiously and saying (approximately), “Did you just see how Ross stuck it to the networks?!?!”

Of course, there were the memorable “Jody-isms”:

“Getting pissed off is not a strategy.”

“Sometimes what the client thinks is a PR problem isn’t.”

“Don’t tell us what to say. Tell us what happened.”

When I joined Powell Tate in 1991, shortly after its founding, there were about 30 of us, of which perhaps five were red-state types. But to Jody, we were all part of the family. No question about it. When God made Jody, He broke the mold.

September 14, 2009

Jody Powell, R.I.P.

Filed under: Asides,Jody Powell — Peter Arnold


(Washington) My friend and mentor Jody Powell has passed on. In the coming days, the press will be filled with stories about how this thirty-something from Georgia revolutionized the role of White House press secretary. But leaving that aside, the real value of Jody was his willingness to treat everyone with whom he worked as part of his extended family. I joined Powell Tate in 1991 as one of its first hires (Thank you, Sheila Tate). I’d been at the company no more than a few weeks — and had met Jody only in passing — when he stopped me on my way out of the office one Friday evening and asked me to join him and his lovely wife Nan for dinner. It was the first of many such acts, not to mention his years of wise counsel. R.I.P., my mentor.